Desk Electronic Calculators

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Featured Electronic Desktop Calculators:

The first electronic desktop calculators were the ANITA Mk VII and Mk 8 which employ vacuum tube technology and were introduced simultanueously in late 1961.

Desktop calculators using Germanium transistors appeared in late 1963/early 1964 with the Friden EC-130, IME 84RC, Sharp Compet CS-10A, and the Mathatron.

In the mid-1960s the first calculators using integrated circuits appeared, initially using many small-scale integrated circuits. Electronic calculators were at the forefront of integrated circuit development, and gradually more of the circuitry was squeezed into fewer integrated circuits, also reducing the size of the calculator. This culminated in the first use of a "calculator on a chip" in the Busicom Junior / NCR 18-16 in 1969.

Featured here are significant desktop calculators and a selection of typical models.

For photographs and brief details of some other desktop electronic calculators see the Desktop Calculator Photo Library on this site.

See also "Precursors and Prototypes" at the bottom of this page, which includes some especially interesting early electronic calculators which never went into production.

For information about the electronics inside the calculators see the Calculator Technology section.
 

Click on a picture below for more details and more, bigger pictures.

The first electronic desktop calculators
... based on vacuum tube technology.

Anita Mk VII

ANITA Mk VII
1961
The Anita Mk VII and Mk 8 were the first electronic desktop calculators.
Four-function, with full-keyboard.
Uses cold-cathode tubes & vacuum tubes (thermionic valves).

Anita Mk 8

ANITA Mk 8
1961
The Anita Mk VII and Mk 8 were the first electronic desktop calculators.
Four-function, with full-keyboard.
Uses cold-cathode tubes & vacuum tubes (thermionic valves).

Some of the first all-transistor electronic desktop calculators

Friden EC132

Friden EC-130 & EC-132
1964
EC130 was one of the first all-transistor desktop calculators.
Four-function, square root.
Uses Germanium transistors, delay-line memory, cathode ray tube display.

IME 84

IME 84
1964
Was one of the first all-transistor desktop calculators.

Four-function, raising to powers.
Uses Germanium transistors & magnetic core memory.

Sharp Compet CS10A

Sharp Compet CS10A
1964
Was one of the first all-transistor desktop calculators.

Four-function, with full-keyboard.
Uses discrete transistors.

The first two programmable desktop calculators

Mathatron

Mathatron
1964

Was one of the first all-transistor desktop calculators. Was programmable
Four-function, square root.
Uses discrete transistors.

Olivetti programma 101

Olivetti programma 101
1965
Was the first stored-program desktop calculator.

Four-function, square root, branching instruction.
Uses discrete transistors.

The first desktop calculator using integrated circuits

Victor 3900

Victor 3900
1965
The first desktop calculator using integrated circuits.

cathode ray tube display.
Problems manufacturing the integrated circuits meant that very few were sold.

A selection of other all-transistor electronic desktop calculators

Casio AL-1000

Casio AL-1000
1967

Four-function, memory, square root, programmable.
Uses Germanium transistors & magnetic core memory.

IME 26

IME 26
1967

Four-function.
Uses Germanium transistors & magnetic core memory.

Monroe Epic 3000

Monroe Epic 3000
1967

Four-function, programmable, with printout.
Uses Germanium transistors & delay-line memories.

Monroe Epic 3000

Canon Canola 130S
1968

Four-function.
Uses Germanium transistors & "light-pipe" display.

Featured electronic desktop calculators, using silicon integrated circuits
... in approximate chronological order

Sharp Compet 22

Sharp Compet 22
1968

Four-function, memory. Could be made programmable by plugging in a "memorizer" unit.
Small-Scale Integration (SSI) integrated circuits.

Anita 1011

Anita 1011
1969

Four-function, %, memory.
Medium-Scale Integration (MSI) integrated circuits & transistors.

Sharp QT-8D

Sharp QT-8D "micro Compet"
1969
First calculator to use Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Four-function.

Toshiba BC1623G
1969
Programmable, 2 memories, square root.
Medium-Scale Integration (MSI) integrated circuits.

Canon Canola 1200

Canon Canola 1200
~1970

Four-function.
Medium-Scale Integration (MSI) integrated circuits.

Facit 1123

Facit 1123
~1970

Four-function.
Small-Scale Integration (SSI) integrated circuits.

Ricohmac 1200

Ricoh RICOMAC 1200
~1970

Four-function.
Medium-Scale Integration (MSI) integrated circuits.

Singer Friden EC1114

Singer Friden EC1114
~1970

Four-function, memory.
Medium-Scale Integration (MSI) integrated circuits.

Adler 1210

Adler 1210
~1971

Four-function, memory.
Medium-Scale Integration (MSI) integrated circuits.

Anita 1011 LSI

ANITA 1011 LSI
~1971

Four-function, memory.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Casio 121K

Casio 121K
~1971

Four-function.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Casio AS-C

Casio AS-C
~1971

Four-function.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Commodore C108

Commodore (cbm) C108 and Adler 804
~1971

Four-function.
Small, low-cost calculator using Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

NCR 18-16

NCR 18-16 (aka Busicom Junior)
~1971
First use of a "calculator on acChip" - All calculator functions in a single Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuit.
Four-function.

Busicom 141-PF / NCR 18-36

Busicom 141-PF / NCR 18-36
1971

Four-function, memory, printout.
The microprocessor was developed for this calculator. Has an Intel 4004 microprocessor - the first product to have "Intel Inside".

Olympia CD200

Olympia CD200
~1971

Four-function.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.
Probably the ugliest calculator ever made.

Singer Friden EC1117

Singer Friden EC1117
~1971

Four-function.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Teal TL-2M

TEAL TL-2M
~1971

Four-function, memory.
Made by Tokyo Electronic Application Laboratory Ltd., a casualty of the crash in calculator prices.

Hitachi KK521

Hitachi KK521
~1972

Four-function, memory.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Sanyo ICC-1122

Sanyo ICC-1122
~1972

"Portable radio"-shaped case.
Four-function, memory.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Summit 3114

Summit 3114
~1972

Four-function, memory.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Advance/Wireless World

Advance / Wireless World
1972
Make it yourself calculator kit.

Four function.
Employs the first Texas Instruments "calculator-on-a-chip".

Rapidman LC1208

Rapid Data Rapidman 1208LC
1972
First desktop models with LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)

Four function, %.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Burroughs C5205

Burroughs C5205
~1973

Four function, memory, Panaplex display.
Medium-Scale Integration (MSI) integrated circuits.

Rockwell 920

Rockwell 920
~1975

Limited scientific, programmable, magnetic card reader, printer.
Large-Scale Integration (LSI) integrated circuits.

Sporting Life Super Settler Mk II

Betting-shop Calculators
~1972 to ~1982

Some specialised calculators for use in settling bets in betting-shops.

Precursors and Prototypes

Some precursors to the electronic desktop calculator and some prototypes which never went into production.

Calculating Typewriters

Bandatronic

Bandatronic
1960

Electronic calculator for invoices with arithmetic unit and up to five typewriters.

Some prototype calculators that never went into production

???

Electrosolids Corp. Electronic Calculator - Computron CC 1200
1961
Transistorised electronic calculator announced.

???

Durham University Electronic Calculator
1962
Hybrid Dekatron/Trigger-tube/Transistor electronic calculator "proof-of-concept" exhibited.

Philips prototype 1.
Philips prototype 2.

Philips Prototype Electronic Calculators
1962

A prototype 3-function electronic calculator and two models of electronic "Comptometer", which never went into production.
A step on the way to the first commercial transistorised eletronic desktop calculators.

Mullard calculator

Mullard Prototype Electronic Calculator
1964

Early, low-cost, electronic calculator, never went into production.
Cold-cathode tubes and transistors.

Mullard calculator

Ultramat SQR-2000
1966

Early, prototype, electronic calculator produced by high-school student.
Transistors.

The first electronic desk calculators of the 1960s and early 1970s were very large and VERY expensive, but were versatile, quick, and silent.
They were so expensive that many could be rented by the week.
If you only wanted to add lists of numbers then mechanical and electro-mechanical calculators were fast and still cost effective into the early 1970s, until the price of the electronic ones plummeted.

There was a general reduction in size, number of electronic components, and cost over this period. For further information see the section on The Calculator Business and the section on Calculator Electronics.

 

This is only a small sample of vintage electronic desktop calculators. There were many more models from many manufacturers.
Other notable early manufacturers were -

 

For featured British desktop electronic calculators see the British Calculators section.

There are photographs and brief details of other desktop electronic calculators on this site in the Desktop Electronic Calculator Photographic Library.

For general information about the electronics of calculators see the Calculator Technology section.

 

An excellent source of information about vintage electronic desk calculators is Rick Bensene's "Old Calulator Web Museum" site http://www.oldcalculatormuseum.com/.

Vintage Calculators

© Text & photographs copyright Nigel Tout   2000-2017  except where noted otherwise.